Reporting & Assessment

Teachers constantly assess students; in every lesson, teachers will be gaining a greater understanding of what student know and can do.  Teachers at Leventhorpe will make what we call "low stakes" assessments all the time while students are in class. A "low stakes" assessment might be a quiz, a test, a piece of writing, a question or even an observation.

These "low stakes" assessments help teachers to know whether students are remembering what they are taught. We call them "low stakes" assessments because the outcome will not have an impact on each student personally, they simply help the teacher adjust their teaching to the class.  Less frequently, we will do more significant assessments, that enables us to compare students and decide on their progress through the year.

We report on students’ progress three times per year in two interim reports and a final written report.  Each report gives information on attitude to learning and academic progress.  We also hold one parents’ consultation a year, where a verbal report is given on progress.

In each subject, students will have been given an academic progress grade based on the work that they have done so far in the current year.  Each subject is very different and so this progress grade will come from a variety of sources: a single big project; the average of a number of tests; a single large test; a practical performance, an overall teacher summary of performance or a combination of these put together.

Reporting Attitude to Learning

At Leventhorpe we believe that the most important thing is a student's attitude to learning.  If this is right, achievement will follow. We call this being “Ready to Learn” and a Leventhorpe student who is “Ready to Learn” will have three distinct qualities: being prepared, being focused and being engaged.

  • Prepared: A student will be ready to learn if they have "prepared" by doing their homework, bringing the right equipment and arriving on time in a calm and positive way.
  • Focused: A student will be ready to learn if they are "focused" in the lesson, listening to their teacher and fellow students, so that they know what to do.
  • Engaged: A student will be ready to learn if they "engage" by doing all that is expected of them to the best of their ability.

Students receive a grade for each following this scheme:

Completely 30%-35% of students Model students who are a real asset in the classroom.
Nearly Always 50%-55% of students Students who are learning well and making the best of their abilities.  Slip-ups are very rare accidents.
Sometimes 10%-15% of students Students who are inconsistent and who are not always making the best of their opportunities.
Rarely 5% of students Students who are often not ready for learning and who may be slowing the progress of others too.

The attitude to learning grade works in the same way for students of all ages, but the current academic grade varies according to the assessment scheme used for the year group a student is in.

Reporting Progress at Leventhorpe School

At Leventhorpe we use three modes of progress reporting dependent on a student's school age.

Year 7-9

In Years 7, 8 and 9 we assess students based on their confidence against knowledge, understanding and skill set out in our learning plans in the different curriculum areas.  We report on the four-step scale where:

4 Exceeding curriculum expectations

3 Achieving curriculum expectations

2 Not always achieving curriculum expectations

1 Rarely achieving curriculum expectations

We have designed our curriculum, the plan of lessons during the year, so that student will make rapid progress towards a high standard at GCSE and so if they are “achieving” this they will be doing well and even better if they are “exceeding” expectations.  Not always achieving will need improvement because there is inconsistency. Finally, rarely achieving will be a concern, because it will indicate that the basics of knowledge and skills are not being laid down for the future.

Year 10-11

In Year 10 and 11, when students are following their GCSE courses, we report progress based on the GCSE (1-9) or BTEC (Pass, Merit, Distinction) grading schemes when students have taken a formal “mock” examination in school.  We do this first in Year 10 in April when we have completed our first set of “mock” exams and then subsequently in Year 11 in January.  In between these formal examinations we report on the likelihood of achieving the GCSE target grade using this scheme:

4             On track to exceed Target Grade

3             On track to achieve Target Grade

2             May not achieve Target Grade

1             Unlikely to achieve Target Grade

Year 12-13

In Year 10 and 11 when students are following their sixth form courses, we report progress based on the A’ Level E-A*) or BTEC (Pass, Merit, Distinction) grading schemes when students have taken a formal examination in school.  We do this first in Year 12 in June when we have completed our first set of “mock” exams and then subsequently in Year 13 in March.  In between these formal examinations we report on the likelihood of achieving the Post-16 target grade using the same four-point scheme as for Year 10-11:

4             On track to exceed Target Grade

3             On track to achieve Target Grade

2             May not achieve Target Grade

1             Unlikely to achieve Target Grade

Setting Target Grades

We think that it is good for even our youngest students to look forward and reflect on the qualifications that they will be aiming for as they get older.  For this reason, we set what we call targets to look forward to.  These targets are at first based on national average progress but if students exceed them, we will raise the target to reflect the faster progress they are making.

Years 7-9

In Years 7-9 every student has been set an end of Year 11 goal which is based on how they did in by the end of primary school.  These goals are expressed as follows:

Band 4 - Aim for grades 7, 8 and 9 at GCSE.

Band 3 - Aim for 5, 6 and 7 grades at GCSE.

Band 2 - Aim for 4 and 5 grades at GCSE.

Band 1 - Focus on achieving grade 4 at GCSE.

In Year 8 and 9 these goals have been based on primary school test scores, while in year 7, as the normal primary school end of keystage assessments were not completed due to the national lockdown, we have based this on online tests (CAT Tests).

At the end of each year, we review these goals and will raise for students who are “exceeding curriculum expectations”.

Years 10-11

At the start of Year 10 we make end of GCSE goals more specific by stating them as a single grade, e.g., “Target Grade 7”.  This target will be decided based on the original end of primary school expectation, modified to reflect performance in Year 7-9.  We view this target as a minimum expectation for students and will encourage them to improve on it through hard work.

Targets in Year 10 can be raised again in the April of Year 10 if performance in the mock exams is strong.

Year 12

In Year 12 every student has an end of course target or goal that is based on how they did in their GCSE examinations.  GCSE grades were awarded through teacher assessment this year (2020-2021) and so it is more difficult to reliable predict a realistic target for the end of the course.  We have taken the average of students’ best grade for English, mathematics and science and uses this project forward a reasonably challenging target for A’ Level or BTEC. This target is not a guarantee of success and many students will score either higher or lower grades than their targets based on their level of effort.

Year 13

In Year 13, students’ targets are based on their average GCSE score from Year 11.  These are related to National Average progress Post-16 to give an indicative target grade.  We would want students to see this target as a minimum expectation for themselves with the reminder that a target is not a guarantee of success and many students will score either higher or lower grades than their targets based on their level of effort.
 

Additional Information on Grade Schemes

GCSE and BTEC grades in Years 10 and 11

Most of the options offered in Years 10 and 11 are GCSEs qualifications.  GCSE subjects award grades on the 1-9 grade scale.

BTEC qualifications offered (Enterprise and iMedia) use a different grade scale consisting of levels one and two graded with: Pass, Merit, Distinction and Distinction Star.  The equivalence of these grades to GCSEs is as follows:

GCSE Grade BTEC Equivalent
Grade 9 -
8.5 points Level 2 Distinction *
Grade 8 -
Grade 7 Level 2 Distinction
Grade 6 -
5.5 points Level 2 Merit
Grade 5 -
Grade 4 Level 2 Pass
Grade 3 Level 1 Distinction
Grade 2 Level 1 Merit
1.25 points Level 1 Pass
Grade 1 -


A Level and BTEC grades in Years 12 and 13

Most of the options offered in Years 12 and 13 are A’ Level qualifications, which use the letter graade scheme.

Vocational qualifications offered by the school (Sport and Exercise, Enterprise and ICT) use a different grade scale consisting of: Pass, Merit, Distinction and Distinction Star.  The equivalence of these grades to A Levels is as follows:

A Level Grades BTEC Equivalent
A* (60 points) -
A (50 points) Distinction *
B (40 points) -
35 points Distinction
C (30 points) -
25 points Merit
D (20 points) -
15 points Pass
E (10 points) -

 

End of A Level Target Grades

At the start of Year 12, we set all students an end of course target for their course of the study expressed as either an A Level or BTEC grade outcome. Initially, we set these targets based on the Department for Education estimates, but the target may be raised by class teachers when they have enough assessment information to raise the grade target to one that is both realistic but stretching for the individual student.